Updated on: 26th Mar 2020
Origin: Mexico
Set of: 18

Mexican paper mache horses 2

Mexican paper mache horses 2 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomascastelazo

Mexican paper mache horses 02

Mexican paper mache dolls

Mexican paper mache dolls Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomascastelazo

Traditional paper mache dolls from Mexico

Mexican paper mache doll 1

Mexican paper mache doll 1 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomascastelazo

Mexican paper mache doll, an early XX century tradition.

Mexican paper mache doll 2

Mexican paper mache doll 2 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomascastelazo

Mexican paper mache doll. An early XX century tradition.

Mexican paper mache doll 3

Mexican paper mache doll 3 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomascastelazo

Mexican paper mache dolls, an early xx century tradition.

Mexican paper mache figures 1

Mexican paper mache figures 1 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomascastelazo

Paper mache figures typical of Corpus Christi day in Mexico.

Mexican curious 1

Mexican curious 1 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomas Castelazo

Paper maché figures in Guanajuato Market, Mexico. Intricate color patterns and color combinations are characteristic of Mexican folk art, that often dwells in the magical, death, and fantastic.

Cultural sincretism in Mexican toys

Cultural sincretism in Mexican toys Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceTomascastelazo

Artcrafts and toys are a tradition on Corpus Christi day in Mexico. sincretism in mexican toys

Cartonería 5

Cartonería 5 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-4.0SourceAriadne Delgado

Model of "La familia Burrón" a mexican comic created by Gabriel Vargas in 1948. The "Cartonería" is considered a Mexican folk art, it consists in a technique in which figures are created through a process of modeling paper. The most popular figures made of this technique are devils, piñatas, bulls, alebrijes, catrinas, skulls, among others.

Cartonería 20

Cartonería 20 Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-4.0SourceGermán Torreblanca

This is a skeleton women, dressed with mexican skirt.She has a baby in his arms. The "Cartonería" is considered a Mexican folk art, it consists in a technique in which figures are created through a process of modeling paper. The most popular figures made of this technique are devils, piñatas, bulls, alebrijes, catrinas, skulls, among others.

Day of the dead, Catrina, Mexico

Day of the dead, Catrina, Mexico Royalty-FreeSource

Multicolored skeleton decor

Day of the dead, Catrina, Mexico

Day of the dead, Catrina, Mexico Royalty-FreeSource

Day of the dead, Catrina, Mexico

Day of the dead

Day of the dead CCO 1.0 - Public DomainSource

Day of the dead

Day of the dead, bride

Day of the dead, bride CCO 1.0 - Public DomainSource

Day of the dead, bride

Paper mache. Mexico

Paper mache. Mexico CCO 1.0 - Public DomainSource

Paper mache. Mexico

Paper mache sculpture of a human skeleton in a red hat

Paper mache sculpture of a human skeleton in a red hat Attribution CC BY 4.0Source

Paper mache sculpture of a human skeleton in a red hat by a Mexican artist. Produced for the Day of the Dead festival (All Saints' Day, Halloween) at Lake Pátzcuaro, Mexico, 2 November 1975

The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis - Alebrije bird sculpture

The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis - Alebrije bird sculpture Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceLoriLee

An "Alebrije" paper mache sculpture in the permanent collection of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Papier mache Day of the Dead sculpture of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

Papier mache Day of the Dead sculpture of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera Attribution ShareAlike CC BY-SA-3.0SourceLoriLee

“During the Mexican celebration of Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos) children and adults play with and display small toys that look like well known-people or skeletons enjoying everyday activities. Artist Miguel Linares made this sculpture to honor Mexican artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo who, as spirits, return to visit friends and family during the celebration.” The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

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